The Tourist Gaze by John Urry

By John Urry

This moment variation deepens our figuring out of the way the vacationer gaze orders and regulates the connection with the vacationer atmosphere, demarcating the "other" and opting for the "out-of-the-ordinary." It elucidates the connection among tourism and embodiment and elaborates at the connections among mobility as a mark of recent and postmodern event and the appeal of tourism as a life-style selection. the result's a publication that builds at the confirmed strengths of the 1st version and revitalizes the argument to deal with the wishes of researchers and scholars within the new century. 

Show description

Read Online or Download The Tourist Gaze PDF

Similar travel & tourism books

Quantitative Tourism Industry Analysis: Introduction to Input-Output, Social Accounting Matrix Modelling and Tourism Satellite Accounts

From the identify and what you will see within the preview facility,
something greater than this sort of simple point will be expected,
the publication isn't really worthy what it expenses

The Study of Tourism: Anthropological and Sociological Beginnings (Tourism Social Science Series) (Tourism Social Science Series)

"This turns into a crucial booklet within the box of tourism. it truly is targeted. " - Jafar Jafari, sequence Editor. the purpose of the booklet is to exploit own histories of pioneers to explain and study the emergence of tourism learn between anthropologically orientated students (those performing as informants one of the earliest to paintings with reference to tourism and proceed still).

The Tourist Gaze

This moment version deepens our realizing of ways the vacationer gaze orders and regulates the connection with the vacationer surroundings, demarcating the "other" and deciding upon the "out-of-the-ordinary. " It elucidates the connection among tourism and embodiment and elaborates at the connections among mobility as a mark of recent and postmodern event and the allure of tourism as a way of life selection.

Heritage Cuisines: Traditions, identities and tourism (Routledge Studies of Gastronomy, Food and Drink)

Nutrition is likely one of the such a lot basic components of tradition and an important marker of local and ethnic identification. It encompasses many different parts of cultural historical past past the actual components required for its construction. those comprise folklore, faith, language, familial bonds, social buildings, environmental determinism, celebrations and ceremonies, landscapes, culinary routes, smells, and tastes, to call yet a number of.

Extra info for The Tourist Gaze

Sample text

The problematic effects of such tourist developments in at least some of the countries are well known. They result from the huge number of tourists and their seasonal demand for services, the deleterious social effects particularly resulting from the gendered work available, the geographical concentration of visitors, the lack of concerted policy response, the cultural differences between hosts and guests, and the demand by 53 The Tourist Gaze The Changing Economics of the Tourist Industry many visitors to be enclosed in expensive 'environmental bubbles'.

These relatively low-level workers are normally female and implicit in the work relations are notions of the 'sexual' servicing of customers or 'indeed of management (see Adkins, 1995). Overlying the interaction, the 'service', are often particular assumptions and notions of gender-specific forms of appropriate behaviour. For many consumers what is actually consumed as a service is the particular moment of delivery by the relatively low-level sei-Vi~e deliverers: the smile on the flight attendant's face, the pleasantness of the manner of the waitress, the sympathy in the eyes of the nurse, and so on.

In 195080 per cent of all long-distance trips were made by automobile and by 1963 43 per cent of American families took long vacation trips each year, averaging 600 miles. There was a rapid improvement of the quality of the road system, to cope with faster travel and higher traffic volume. Unfortunately there was little to see from the new roads except the monotony of the road itself. John Steinbeck I l 54 ( wrote that 'it will be possible to drive from New York to California without seeing a single thing' (quoted in JakIe, 1985: 190).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.89 of 5 – based on 43 votes